From the Science Wars to political emotions: philosophy, biology and justice

by Fabrizzio Mc Manus Nowadays, it is a cliché to invoke biology, psychology or the newest branch of cognitive science to defend the claim that there is such thing as a Human Nature. We find appeals to this notion every time someone explains in terms of intrinsic properties forged by Evolution why some particular group … Continue reading From the Science Wars to political emotions: philosophy, biology and justice

The virtues of moderation, part II

edited by SciSal [This is an excerpt from James Grimmelmann’s paper “The virtues of moderation” published in the Yale Journal of Law and Technology (2015). The relevance to our webzine should be obvious. The excerpt presented below was pieced together by SciSal editor Dan Tippens and is reproduced here with permission from the author. Part … Continue reading The virtues of moderation, part II

The virtues of moderation, part I

edited by SciSal [This is an excerpt from James Grimmelmann’s paper “The virtues of moderation” published in the Yale Journal of Law and Technology (2015) [1]. The relevance to our webzine should be obvious… The excerpt presented below was pieced together by SciSal editor Dan Tippens and is reproduced here with permission from the author. … Continue reading The virtues of moderation, part I

The debate about funding of basic scientific research

by Massimo Pigliucci On the one hand we have politicians — usually, indeed almost invariably, conservatives and sometimes libertarians; on the other hand we have scientists — usually, indeed almost invariably, people whose work is in the corners of science most remote from any practical application. The debate is about whether, and to what extent, … Continue reading The debate about funding of basic scientific research

The formal Darwinism project

[From time to time the Editors at Scientia Salon select an interesting paper from the primary scientific or philosophical literature to highlight for a broader public. These posts simply include the abstract of the paper and a few choice quotations, occasionally accompanied by brief editorial comments. The idea is to develop an appreciation for what front … Continue reading The formal Darwinism project

Everyone has moral obligations (And we’re talking about them way too much)

by Daniel A. Kaufman “The most disturbing aspect of ‘morality’ seems to me to be the frequency with which the word now appears; in the press, on television, in the most perfunctory kinds of conversation… There is something quite facile going on, some self-indulgence at work. Of course we would all like to ‘believe’ in … Continue reading Everyone has moral obligations (And we’re talking about them way too much)

Yes, terminal patients still have moral obligations

by Daniel Tippens [This is the first of two essays, by Dan Tippens and Dan Kaufman, about the concept of moral obligations. Kaufman’s response to Tippens will appear later this week.] When I was eighteen, my father was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer and given a year and a half to live. This prognosis was … Continue reading Yes, terminal patients still have moral obligations